Research

Who are you to tell me that?! The moderating effect of performance feedback source and psychological entitlement on individual performance

Recent research suggests that the effectiveness of negative performance feedback may be dependent on the feedback source as well as the recipient’s sense of psychological entitlement. We conduct an experiment wherein we manipulate the valence and source level of performance feedback and examine the moderating effect of psychological entitlement in a fixed-pay environment. We find that when negative performance feedback is issued by a superior-level source, greater levels of psychological entitlement lead to higher performance. In contrast, when negative performance feedback is issued by a peer-level source, greater levels of psychological entitlement lead to lower performance improvement. Consistent with the extant literature, psychological entitlement and source level do not influence individuals’ responses to positive performance feedback. Our results suggest that companies should encourage supervisors to deliver negative performance feedback, particularly to entitled employees.

Publication Information
Article Title: Who are you to tell me that?! The moderating effect of performance feedback source and psychological entitlement on individual performance
Journal: Journal of Management Accounting Research (2017)
2
Author(s): Holderness, Kip;  Olsen, Kari;  Thornock, Todd
Researcher Information
    
Thornock, Todd
Thornock, Todd
Assistant Professor
Expertise:
  • Personality and Individual Differences
  • Incentive Compensation
  • Performance Feedback
  • Management Control Systems
  • Cost Management
Accountancy
HLH 445 C
P.O. Box 880488
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln, NE 68588-0488, USA
Phone: (402) 472-4125
tthornock2@unl.edu