CARMA Classroom

Short Courses Overview

Each CARMA short course is typically a two or two and a half day session on a research method or data analysis topic. CARMA Short Courses place an emphasis on hands-on experience and on the application of the methodology aimed at skills development through equal amount of lecture and lab-time. Instructors are leading methodological scholars recognized within the organizational studies and management areas as experts on their topics. Several are current or past editors of leading organizational journals. Our list of short courses include introductory and advanced training on topics that might not be readily available at your institution. In addition, our short courses provide students and faculty with the opportunity to network with leading scholars and other students/faculty in their areas of interest.

More than 1,200 faculty and students from universities throughout the world have attended CARMA Short Courses since the summer of 2004. Past locations of these courses include Virginia and Michigan in the United States, as well as Brazil, Australia, India, The Netherlands, Israel, and China.

CARMA Short Course Evaluations

Past Participants had this to say about the CARMA Short Course program:

  • "Expert instructors, lively instruction, good balance between presentation and application."
  • "The instructors did a great job explaining (1) conceptual issues (2) statistical content; (3) actually working with the program package."
  • "Instructors were really awesome, the program as a whole was very organized and on schedule"
  • "The instructor was terrific! The venue was excellent."
  • "I really thought the course was outstanding in all regards! Very helpful to my own research/publication efforts."
  • "Excellent instructor! Extremely knowledgeable. We were able to actually practice/apply the theory to an article. Great experience!"
  • "Superb program – great contribution to academic community around the country."
  • "Everything was wonderful – thank you so much for creating a format through which the knowledge could be so easily and cleanly passed on."
  • "Absolutely awesome! Well worth the time and money!"
  • "This is an excellent program that I will recommend to my colleagues. I really appreciated the hospitality, the quality of lectures/materials, and the friendliness and accessibility of the instructors. Thank you very much – I learned a lot."

Short Courses in Adelaide, Australia, April 8-12, 2019 - Two Sessions, Two Courses

Hosted by University of South Australia

Session 1: April 8-10 | Session 2: April 10-12

University of South Australia logo

Short Course Sessions and Groupings

We offer two sessions which allows course participants the opportunity to take two back-to-back courses.


Session 1

Monday April 8 (all day), Tuesday April 9 (all day), and Wednesday April 10 (AM half day)

Session 2

Wednesday April 10 (PM half day), Thursday April 11 (all day), and Friday April 12 (all day)

Session I: April 8-10

 Ernest O’Boyle

Option #1: “Systematic Reviews / Meta Analysis” – Associate Professor Ernest O’Boyle, Indiana University

Course Description
Meta-analyses have now become a staple of research in the organizational sciences. Their purpose is to summarize and clarify the extant literature through systematic and transparent means. Meta-analyses help answer long-standing questions, address existing debates, and highlight opportunities for future research. Despite their prominence, knowledge and expertise in meta-analysis is still restricted to a relatively small group of scholars. This short course is intended to expand that group by familiarizing individuals with the key concepts and procedures of meta-analysis with a practical focus. Specifically, the goal is to provide the necessary tools to conduct and publish a meta-analysis/systematic review using best practices. We will cover how to; (a) develop research questions that can be addressed with meta-analysis, (b) conduct a thorough search of the literature, (c) provide accurate and reliable coding, (d) correct for various statistical artifacts, and (e) analyze bivariate relationships (e.g., correlations, mean differences) as well as multivariate ones using meta-regression and meta-SEM. The course is introductory, so no formal training in meta-analysis is needed. Familiarity with some basic statistical concepts such as sampling error, correlation, and variation is sufficient.

Required Software: Microsoft Excel; R


Session II: April 10-12

Robert Vandenberg

Option #2: “Introduction to Structural Equation Methods” – Professor Robert Vandenberg, University of Georgia

Course Description
This introductory course requires no previous knowledge of structural equation modeling (SEM), but participants should possess a strong understanding of regression. While I will primarily use Mplus in my examples, I will when possible also have the R code for the examples using the LAVAAN package. If you plan to use R instead of Mplus, you need to have LAVAAN preinstalled on your computer, and you also need to have a very strong understanding about the data handling functions using R. There is not enough workshop time to go through R basics, and to assist you in installing LAVAAN. The course will start with an overview of the principals underlying SEM. Subsequently, we move into measurement model evaluation including confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Time will be spent on interpreting the parameter estimates and comparing competing measurement models for correlated constructs. We will then move onto path model evaluation where paths representing “causal” relations are placed between the latent variables. Again, time will be spent on interpreting the various parameter estimates and determining whether the path models add anything above their underlying measurement models. If time permits, longitudinal models and other advanced topics will be introduced.

Required Software: Mplus or R installed with LAVAAN package


Registration, Pricing, Advanced Registration Deadline

To register for 2019 CARMA Short Courses in Adelaide, Australia, you must first log in to your CARMA account (If you do not already have an account, please sign-up as a website user). Once you have logged in, and you are in the User Area, select "Purchase Short Course" on the right side of the page.

Non-member prices per course: *All prices are in US Dollars (USD)
• Faculty/Professional: $900.00
• Students: $700.00
CARMA Member prices per course
• Faculty/Professional: $450.00
• Students: $350.00

If your organization is not yet a member but would like to become one, please contact us directly at carma@unl.edu.

All participants are eligible for the following discount:
Register for both sessions, receive $75 off the total price.

Advanced Registration Deadline is Friday, March 22, 2019. After this date, a $75.00 fee will be added to all registrations.

Short Courses in Detroit, Michigan, June 3-8, 2019 - Two Sessions, Twelve Course Options

Hosted by Wayne State University

Session 1: June 3-5, Six Course Options | Session 2: June 6-8, Six Course Options

Short Course Sessions and Groupings

We offer two sessions which allows course participants the opportunity to take two back-to-back courses that complement one another. All courses in a session are taught concurrently, so a participant can take only one course per session.

Complete Course Listing

Session 1

Monday June 3 (all day), Tuesday June 4 (all day), and Wed. June 5 (half day)

Session 2

Thursday June 6 (all day), Friday June 7 (all day), and Sat. June 8 (half day)

  1. "Introduction to Meta-Analysis" - Dr. Ernest O’Boyle, Indiana University
  2. "Advanced SEM I: Measurement Invariance, Latent Growth Modeling & Nonrecursive Modeling" - Dr. Robert Vandenberg
  3. "Introduction to Multilevel Analysis" - Dr. James LeBreton
  4. "Introduction to R" - Dr. Scott Tonidandel
  5. "Intro to Big Data and Data Mining with R" - Dr. Jeff Stanton
  6. "Intermediate Regression: Multivariate/Logistic, Mediation/Moderation" - Dr. Ron Landis
  1. "Intermediate SEM: Model Evaluation" - Dr. Larry J Williams
  2. "Advanced SEM II: Missing Data Issue in SEM, Multi-Level SEM and Latent Interactions" - Dr. Robert Vandenberg
  3. "Advanced Multilevel Analysis" - Dr. Paul Bliese
  4. "Multivariate Statistics with R" - Dr. Steve Culpepper
  5. "Analysis of Big Data" - Dr. Fred Oswald
  6. "Advanced Regression: Alternatives to Difference Scores, Polynomial and Response Surface Methods" - Dr. Jeff Edwards

Session 1: June 3-5, Six Course Options

Option #1: “Introduction to Meta-Analysis" - Dr. Ernest O’Boyle, Indiana University

Course Description
This course provides the participant with knowledge concerning the major meta-analysis models used in research in organizational science and other sciences. The course also details all steps in conducting a systematic review. Thus, this course is not solely a statistics/methods course but provides the participant with knowledge needed to conduct a meta-analysis and systematic review consistent with the Meta­Analysis Reporting Standards (MARS). Free software is made available to the participants and hands-on practice in the software is incorporated into the course. The course also addresses emerging topics in meta-analysis and systematic reviews including meta-regression, meta-structural equation modeling, and publication bias.

Required Software: R and Microsoft Excel


Option #2: "Advanced SEM I: Measurement Invariance, Latent Growth Modeling & Nonrecursive Modeling" - Dr. Robert Vandenberg, University of Georgia

Course Description
The short course covers three advanced structural equation modeling (SEM) topics: (a) testing measurement invariance; (b) latent growth modeling; and (c) evaluating reciprocal relationships in SEM. The instructor uses the Mplus SEM software package throughout the workshop. To get maximum benefit from this short course, the participants should have the full version of Mplus loaded on their laptops and bring the laptop with them to the course. The instructor lectures about half of the time with the remaining time devoted to having participants run examples with actual data provided by the instructor. Participants go home with usable examples and syntax. The measurement invariance testing section focuses on the procedures as outlined in the Vandenberg and Lance (2000) Organizational Research Methods article. Namely, we will cover the 9 invariance tests starting with the tests of equal variance-covariance matrices and ending with tests of latent mean differences. Other outcomes of covering these tests are how to use Mplus syntax, how to do multi-sample analyses, and also how to test hypothesized (a priori) group mean differences but using the latent means of the latent variables within each group. Thus, the first section accomplishes much more than the just the measurement invariance tests. The workshop then advances to operationalizing latent growth models within the SEM framework. Essentially, this is how to use one's longitudinal data to actually capture the dynamic processes in one's theory. Thus, it is very, very different than cross-sectional tests where one is stuck in one point in time. Again, this is what goes on at the surface level, but the participant will also be exposed to modeling how the change in one variable impacts change in another. We will also use mixed modeling. And at the end of it, I introduce the participants to latent profile modeling with latent growth curves. The final piece is the testing of models with feedback loops via an SEM-Journal article by Edward Rigdon (1995). We will go through his 4 different models and what they mean.

Required Software: MPlus (order the full version, try the free demo version)

Option #3: "Introduction to Multilevel Analysis" - Dr. James LeBreton, Pennsylvania State University

Course Description
The CARMA Introduction to Multilevel Analysis short course provides both (1) the theoretical foundation, and (2) the resources and skills necessary to conduct basic multilevel analyses. Emphasis will be placed on techniques for traditional, hierarchically nested data (e.g., children in classrooms; employees in teams). The first part of the course introduces issues related to multilevel theory (e.g., multilevel constructs; principles of multilevel theory building; cross-level inferences and cross-level biases). The second part of the course discusses issues related to multilevel measurement (e.g., aggregation; aggregation bias; composition and compilation models of emergence; estimating within-group agreement). The last part of the course focuses on the specification of basic 2-level models (e.g., children nested in classrooms; soldiers nested in platoons; employees nested within work teams) analyzed via multilevel regression (i.e., random coefficient regression; hierarchical linear model; mixed effects model). The R software package will be introduced, explained, and emphasized during this short course in preparation for the advanced short course offered in Session II. Participants who prefer HLM, SAS, SPSS, or MPlus (and have expertise with these programs) have the option of completing some assignments with these programs. Participants are encouraged to also bring datasets to the course and apply the principles to their specific areas of research. The course is best suited for faculty and graduate students who are familiar with traditional (i.e., single-level) multiple regression analysis, but have little (if any) expertise related to conducting multilevel analyses.

  • Module 1: Multilevel Theory: Constructs, Inferences, and Composition Models
  • Module 2: Multilevel Measurement: Aggregation, Aggregation Bias, & Cross-Level Inference
  • Module 3: Multilevel Measurement: Estimating Interrater Agreement & Reliability
    • Examples using R
    • Examples using SPSS Software (time permitting)
  • Module 4: Multilevel Measurement and Multilevel Modeling: A Simple Illustration of Analyzing Composite Variables in Hierarchical Linear Models
    • Examples using R
    • Examples using SPSS Software (time permitting)
  • Module 5: Review of the 2-Level Model and Final Q & A
  • Other topics (only if time permits) might include:
    • Extension of the 2-level model to the study of growth and change (i.e., growth model)
    • Different centering/scaling stragies (e.g., group-mean centering vs. grand-mean centering)

Required Software: R ( download here ), RStudio ( download here )

Option #4: "Introduction to R" - Dr. Scott Tonidandel, Davidson College

Course Description
This course will provide a gentle introduction to the R computing platform and the R-Studio interface. We will cover the basics of R such as importing and exporting data, understanding R data structures, and R packages. You will also learn strategies for data manipulation within R (compute, recode, selecting cases, etc.) and best practices for data management. We will work through examples of how to conduct basic statistical analyses in R (descriptive, correlation, regression, T-test, ANOVA) and graph those results. Finally, we will explore user-defined functions in R and lay the groundwork for understanding how to perform more complex analyses presented in later CARMA short courses.

Required Software: R (download here), R Studio (download here)


Option #5: “Intro to Big Data and Data Mining with R” - Dr. Jeff Stanton, Syracuse University

Course Description

Big data has been a buzzword for several years both in academia and industry. Although the term is vague and is certainly overused, it does encompass some interesting new ideas and unfamiliar analytical techniques. Notable among these is “data mining,” a family of analytical methods for clustering, classifying, and predicting that go a step beyond the statistical methods used by many social science researchers. In this short course, we will discuss the dimensions of big data and the conceptual steps involved in data mining. Students are welcome to bring their own data sets for experimentation on their own, but this is not required.

We will use the open source statistical processing language, R, for most of the work we do in the course. Extensibility is the hallmark of R; its system of add-on packages provides access to an unequaled range of analytical tools and techniques. You do not have to be an expert in R to take this course, although you will find the course easier if you also take the introduction to R offered by CARMA earlier in the week. Prior to the course, I will ask students to install R on their personal computers and review the first few chapters of my free eTextbook, An Introduction to Data Science. Depending on the interests and preferences of the students, we also use the Rattle or R-Studio graphical user interfaces.

The ideal student will have an interest in using R, knowledge of some basic descriptive and inferential statistics, and some curiosity about exploring alternative, empirically driven strategies for analysis of large data sets. No prior experience with data mining is required and students who participate successfully in this short course can expect to learn enough about data mining to begin experimenting with these tools in research or teaching.

Required Software: R (download here), R Studio (download here)

Option #6: "Intermediate Regression: Multivariate/Logistic, Mediation/Moderation" - Ron Landis, Illinois Institute of Technology

Course Description
This short course will begin with a brief review of linear regression, followed by consideration of advanced topics including multivariate regression, use of polynomial regression, logistic regression, and the general linear model. We will pay particular attention to using regression to test models involving mediation and moderation. For all topics, examples will be discussed and assignments completed using either data provided by the instructor or by the short course participants.

Required Software: R (download here) or SPSS (free trial version)


Session 2: June 6-8, Six Courses

Option #1: “Intermediate SEM: Model Evaluation" - Dr. Larry J Williams, University of Nebraska

Dr. Larry Williams, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Course Description
This course is aimed at faculty and students with an introductory understanding of structural equation methods who seek a better understanding of the challenging process of making judgments about the adequacy of their models. Those who attend should have experience in fitting structural equation models with software such as LISREL, MPlus, EQS, or AMOS. This experience requirement can be met by completion of the Introduction to SEM Short Course. Attendees will be expected to bring their own laptop computers installed with their SEM software, and they should also know how to import data from an SPSS save file into their SEM software program. Attendees will learn out to interpret and report results from SEM analyses, and how to conduct model comparisons to obtain information relevant to inferences about their models, as well as advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to model evaluation. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own data for use during parts of the short course.

The course will consist of five sections, with each section having a lecture and lab component using exercises and data provided by the instructor:
• Review of model specification and parameter estimation
• Overview of model evaluation
• Logic and computations for goodness-of-fit measures
• Analysis of residuals and latent variables
• Model comparison strategies

Required Software: Your preferred SEM software package, SPSS (free trial edition), MPlus or Amos

Option #2: "Advanced SEM II: Missing Data Issue in SEM, Multi-Level SEM and Latent Interactions" - Dr. Robert Vandenberg, University of Georgia

Course Description
The workshop covers three advanced structural equation modeling (SEM) topics: (a) multilevel modeling; (b) latent interactions; and (c) dealing with missing data in SEM applications. The instructor uses the Mplus SEM software package throughout the workshop. To get maximum benefit from this short course, the participants should have the full version of Mplus loaded on their laptops and bring the laptop with them to the course. The instructor lectures about half of the time with the remaining time devoted to having participants run examples with actual data provided by the instructor. Participants go home with usable examples and syntax. The multilevel modeling section starts out using observed variables only, and no latent variables. Parallels are drawn in this approach and the other packages such as HLM. The main purpose here, though, is to teach participants the basics of multilevel modeling such as aggregation, cross-level interactions and cross-level direct effects. The workshop advances to using latent variables in a multi-level environment. Particular focus will be on multilevel confirmatory factor analysis whereby separate measurement models are estimated at both the within and between levels. The topic then switches to multilevel path modeling with emphasis on between vs. within modeling, and the estimation of cross-level interaction and direct effects among latent variables. The latent interaction section focuses on specifying interactions among latent variables in SEM models. This section starts out with a review of basic interaction testing within a regression environment (using Mplus). From this foundation, participants will move into specifying interactions among latent variables and how to test hypotheses with interactions. And from this point, the workshop will move into moderated-mediation but from the SEM perspective. The final segment of the short course deals with missing data. A great deal of time at the beginning is spent on missing data patterns and why they occur. The workshop then moves into the old methods of dealing with missing data such as listwise and pairwise deletion, and mean or regression based imputation. The disadvantages of those methods are discussed. We then move into covering the newer methods for dealing with missing data, multiple imputation, and full information maximum likelihood. Participants will be showed how to utilize the latter methods in Mplus.

Required Software: MPlus (order the full version, try the free demo version)

Option #3: "Advanced Multilevel Analysis" - Dr. Paul Bliese, University of South Carolina

Course Description
The CARMA Advanced Multilevel Analysis short course provides both (1) the theoretical foundation, and (2) the resources and skills necessary to conduct more advanced multilevel analyses. Emphasis will be placed on techniques for longitudinal data. The R software package will be introduced, explained, and used throughout this short course. The topics covered in this course include specifying and analyzing basic, 2-level, models (e.g., individuals nested in teams; repeated observations nested in individuals), as well as, more advanced 3-level models (e.g., individuals nested in teams that are nested in organizations; repeated observations nested in individuals that are nested in teams). Other topics include: multilevel mediation and the analysis of dyadic data. Exercises using real-world data, are conducted in R. Participants who prefer HLM, SAS, SPSS, or MPlus (and have expertise with these programs) will have the option of completing some assignments with these programs. Participants are encouraged to also bring datasets to the course and apply the principles to their specific areas of research. The course is best suited for faculty and graduate students who have at least some foundational understanding of issues related to multilevel data and how to analyze simple, 2-level, models.

  • Module 1: 2-Level Mixed Models: Cross-Level Main Effects & Interactions
    • Examples using R
  • Module 2: Analyzing Change and Growth: 2-Level Growth Model
    • Examples using R
  • Module 3: 3-level Models
    • Examples using R
  • Module 4: Multilevel Mediation
    • Examples using R
  • Module 5: Analyzing Dyadic Data
    • Examples using R
    • Other topics (only if time permits) might include:
      • Multilevel Models for Non-Normal Outcome Variables
      • Bayes Estimates in R
      • Discontinuous Growth Models

    Required Software: R ( download here ), RStudio ( download here )

    Option #4: “Multivariate Statistics with R” - Dr. Steven Culpepper, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

    Course Description
    This course continues the introduction to R from the first session by covering advanced topics related to multivariate statistics. We will cover topics related to data management for multivariate data and will provide an overview of plotting and visualizing multivariate data in R. Specific learning outcomes include learning how to conduct analyses involving:

    • Multiple regression and diagnostics
    • Exploratory factor analysis and principal components
    • Multivariate regression, canonical correlation, and MANOVA
    • Topics in statistical computation (e.g., bootstrapping, Monte Carlo simulation)
    • Structural equation modeling with the lavaan package
    • Reproducible research for quantitative reports

    The session will provide participants with some discussion of necessary background knowledge and practical exercises.

    Required Software: R (download here), R Studio (download here), and tex (for Windows: http://miktex.org/ , for OS X http://www.tug.org/mactex/, for Ubuntu/Debian (Linux): apt-get install texlive or http://www.tug.org/texlive/ )

    Option #5: "Analysis of Big Data" - Dr. Fred Oswald, Rice University

    Oswald

    Course Description

    This short course provides students with hands-on skills for developing and running predictive models for relevant to 'big data' in organizations. A range of predictive models will be covered: e.g., lasso and elastic net regression, random forest, stochastic gradient boosted trees, and support vector machines. R and all required R packages need to be set up on your laptop beforehand; the instructor will provide set-up instructions and guidance in advance; other data, materials, and assignments will be provided by the instructor (code, files).

    Required Software: TBA


    Option #6: “Advanced Regression: Alternatives to Difference Scores, Polynomial and Response Surface Methods” - Dr. Jeff Edwards, University of North Carolina

    Course Description
    For decades, difference scores have been used in studies of fit, similarity, and agreement in organizational research. Despite their widespread use, difference scores have numerous methodological problems. These problems can be overcome by using polynomial regression and response surface methodology to test hypotheses that motivate the use of difference scores. These methods avoid problems with difference scores, capture the effects difference scores are intended to represent, and can examine relationships that are more complex than those implied by difference scores.

    This short course will review problems with difference scores, introduce polynomial regression and response surface methodology, and illustrate the application of these methods using empirical examples. Specific topics to be addressed include: (a) types of difference scores; (b) questions that difference scores are intended to address; (c) problems with difference scores; (d) polynomial regression as an alternative to difference scores; (e) testing constraints imposed by difference scores; (f) analyzing quadratic regression equations using response surface methodology; (g) difference scores as dependent variables; and (h) answers to frequently asked questions.

    Required Software: SPSS (free trial version) or STATA