June 10, 2014

Start Your Story: Molly Rezich

Molly Rezich
Molly Rezich plans to start an organization to bring live music to children’s hospitals, nursing homes and other places that will benefit. A music performance and German double major, Rezich believes a business minor from the College of Business Administration will help her achieve her goals.

“It takes a lot to start something like a non-profit organization. My business minor has given me the knowledge to prioritize and streamline in a startup environment,” she said. “I honestly feel like I would not be prepared to go out into the real world without my business minor. It’s all fundamental knowledge that everyone should know.”

Designed to complement any non-business major, the CBA business minor requires 18 hours of course work. Each student enrolls in six designated business classes in the areas of accounting, business law, economics, finance, marketing and management. Students can also tailor the classes to fit their schedules as courses are offered on-campus and online as well as during the fall, spring and summer.

Rezich, a sophomore from Rapid City, S.D., is a lifelong musician and plays cello, piano, bass and drums. Her love for playing cello started at a young age.

“I have always loved music, and I am the musical one in my family. In fifth grade, I picked up cello and it was a natural fit,” she said.

She took private lessons and played in her school’s orchestra. Yet it wasn’t until her mother urged her to share her talent and play at local nursing homes she realized music would be her future career path.

“I would play anything for them – even something as simple as ‘Twinkle Twinkle Little Star’ – and their faces would just light up. They would think the world of the performance. It inspired me to play for people,” she said.

These experiences led Rezich to major in music performance.

“I plan to bring music to the people who need it most – those in hospitals and hospice centers. I want people to have music in their lives,” she explained.

Preparing for her future, she continues to challenge herself as a musician. Rezich plays for the UNL Orchestra, performs at weddings, and is in an indie folk band called Purple Hays. She already applies her business minor to her band and business.

“As a musician, it is so crucial to have fundamental business knowledge. Anyone can sign a contract, but you need to be able to read and understand it to make a good business decision,” she said.

Rezich recommends the business minor to anyone who pursues the fine and performing arts as a career.

“You may first pursue it because it is practical,” she explained. “In reality, I love business because it can be fun and challenging, and it forces you to focus your creativity and strategize.”